Liera vs Igor Paiva

We drilled passing this past saturday at comp class. I am putting a couple of videos of Liera Jr.'s matches up because they highlight the basic strategies we covered.

A few things I'd like you to note:

1) he is patiently persistent. This is a big message I am always trying to get across on our mat. Where a lot of people miss it in Jiu Jitsu is that they think good Jiu Jitsu is aggressive, meaning domineering via forceful execution. There are a few times that Liera does dive on things, however that is either because a) he see's a large opening, or b) masters of varying tempo can utilize the full spectrum of execution speed. If I lull you into one rhythm and then suddenly downshift and accelerate, I can complete the move. Note though that at least 98% of his movement, (particularly his passing), is simply patiently persistent. Which leads to point #2....


2) he is almost always moving. 100% of the time he is "reading" his partner and trying to make it difficult his partner to read his movement. A big part of Jiu Jitsu is just that; who can read the other player better. Look at two great example in our academy.

I've said before that my primary training partner as a white belt was 125 lbs. By the time I got to blue belt I could hang with all the big guy blues, not because I used a pressure game, (easy to learn), but I used a tempo game, (hard to learn). My friend was forced to learn the tempo game. Because I was a good training partner, I got to learn the tempo game.

What drives me nuts is when people who have minimal Jiu Jitsu experience think that competition training is just beating the shit out of each other. That is easy to learn. Learning tempo, timing, and good technique is hard. You can't add more horsepower to shitty Jiu Jitsu and then magically turn it into good Jiu Jitsu. It's still just shitty Jiu Jitsu. As an aside, that is where the self defense nuts drive me crazy. You can't add aggression to horrific technique and then expect that to magically transform into martial skill that allows you to defeat someone 100lbs heavier than you.

Next tempo example; Ji in a gi. He would be too shy to say it, but he is a master of tempo. He trains it everyday. Note that above I said masters of varying tempo can utilize the full spectrum of execution speed. If I lull you into one rhythm and then suddenly downshift and accelerate, I can complete the move. Often times new students focus on that end of the spectrum. That doesn't make them spazs, it means they are uneducated and it is an opportunity for us to show them a better way.

Being a master of tempo, Ji will lull you into a tempo and then. just. stop. moving. He will freeze and do nothing. While just a moment ago his partner was trying to read him and figure out what he is doing, he will slightly disengage and then freeze. That gives him the opportunity to keep reading his partner. He can then choose to pursue an opening he sees or just go back to moving. Either way it gives his partner one move thing to think about which is kind of the goal. You can overwhelm your partner with analysis paralysis much more effectively than you can by blindly using aggression.

Remember, the goal is to get a better position than your partner. I can forcibly move you, or I can trick you into moving to the bad position for me. One of those you can still do when you're old, sick, etc.