Competitor groups

Competition prep goes far beyond our weekly comp class. Our regular weekly class schedule divides students up based upon the problem set(s) that engage the student most effectively. For instance, beginning students do a lot of work with the basics, and nothing else. This allows them to focus on material most beneficial to them. Rather than dividing the academy, this helps build it. The more advanced students attend all of the classes, because they know that “advanced” moves are often times simply clever combinations of the basics.

We apply the same method to our competition team. To best prepare individual competitors and the academy as a whole we divide athletes into groups. I feel that this is the best way for our academy to not just approach each competition season, but to set the tone for the future of the academy. Groups are defined by the expectations of the individuals within them.

 
 

Novice

  • Show up

  • Put in work

  • Have a good attitude

  • Have fun

Candidate

  • All of the previous expectations, plus:

  • Discover holes in game

  • Get comfortable competing

pro

  • All of the previous expectations, plus:

  • Win

We introduced this idea last camp and had great success with it. Now we will build off of that momentum and further develop the team. The ‘“expectation” of win for the Pro’s is said a little tongue in cheek. We all want to win but that doesn’t always happen. The expectation is posted to give a little scale to our collective focus. The participants in the first two groups are essentially focusing on orienting themselves to the competition environment. I certainly hope that all of us win. By the time a competitor makes their way to our designation of Pro they should already have a handle on the basics and should be solely focusing on winning.

My intent is for us to better assist one another in preparation. I think a win at all costs mentality often consists of short cuts. We are all interested in developing a solid foundational skill set of preparing correctly and approaching the tournament correctly. So if you are struggling in the beginning you can take a step back and look at the bigger picture. When we see the pros killing it in our room, we can similarly understand that we are not preparing to compete against those in our room, but a room full of beasts training to compete against us. Fun, fun, fun!!